Friday, October 11, 2019

#1 Green Rootzone


The white lines in the soil profile show a solid commitment to the cultural practices needed to sustain USGA putting greens.  This is all the sand that has been incorporated by various forms or aerification.

US Forest Service


This afternoon, foresters with the US Forest Service are on site at HCC collecting as many acorns as possible.  There goal would be to leave with 2,000 lbs.  These acorns are shipped to the eastern part of the state where they are grown into trees and then used in reforestation projects.  That's pretty neat to think that Highlands CC trees are being used to replenish Oak species in other parts of the country.  They have a variety of tools at their fingertips, from air compressors to large vacuums to what looks like a golf ball picker to harvest acorns off the ground!   

#15 Bridge


On #15, someone decided to take their cart across the new walk bridge.  Please leave this for foot traffic only!  In the meantime, we did place a couple stakes in front of the bridge.

Monday, October 07, 2019

Planning Ahead...

Please note these important aerification dates for later this fall:

On Tuesday, October 15th, we will aerate tees with 3/4” tines.

On October 23rd, we will aerate and topdress 2 of the 3 croquet lawns. 

On November 4th and 5th, we will Dryject greens 2x in addition to approaches. 

Later that week, we will aerate the final croquet lawn.

During the week of November 11th, we will be verticutting and sanding approaches. 

If you have any questions regarding any of these date or programs, please don’t hesitate to contact me!  It’s important to get these processes complete prior to the ground freezing. 


Friday, October 04, 2019

USGA: Photosyntesis

Why Photosynthesis Is Important For Golfers

October 04, 2019
Patrick O'Brien, agronomist, Southeast Region
Thinning or removing trees to aid turfgrass photosynthesis is a key ingredient in a successful agronomic program.
Plants performing photosynthesis is an essential component of life on our planet. Photosynthesis provides the air we breathe and the food we eat. For golfers, photosynthesis is also the key to enjoying great playing conditions. Without healthy turfgrass on a golf course, the game of golf isn’t as much fun to play.
Many of us probably remember from our elementary school science class that plants require photosynthesis to live. To complete photosynthesis, three key inputs – water, carbon dioxide and sunlight – are required. For grass on a golf course, water is provided by rain events and supplemented with irrigation during dry periods. Carbon dioxide is provided by the atmosphere and the air golfers exhale. Sunlight provides the energy that allows grass plants to turn carbon dioxide and water into sugars that the plants use to grow.
Of these three key inputs, the one that most often limits photosynthesis on a golf course is a lack of sunlight caused by shade from trees. Most golf course grasses require nearly full sunlight conditions for optimal growth. Without sufficient daily sunlight, energy production in the plants slows, which leads to thin, weak turf and poor playing conditions.
Shade caused by trees can be a major factor in poor playing conditions on tees, greens, fairways and roughs due to its impact on photosynthesis. When golf facilities consider planting a tree, it is always important to consider its future impact. Over a 20-year time span, most trees grow dramatically. If not managed properly, trees can overtake the landscape. Without proper attention and long-range planning, trees will outcompete golf course turf for sunlight and water. This will negatively impact photosynthesis on golf course playing surfaces and eventually cause poor playing conditions. 

USGA: Autumn Golf


Trees and Golf from USGA

Five Things Every Golfer Should Know About Trees On The Course

October 04, 2019
George Waters, manager, Green Section Education
Trees offer many benefits to golf courses, but also add potential playability and maintenance issues.
Trees have a complicated relationship with golf courses. They can create stunning visual backdrops, help define the character of a golf course, provide habitat for animals, improve air quality and screen undesirable views. However, when the leaves begin to fall we are reminded that trees also have their costs. Having the right trees in the right spots maximizes their benefits and minimizes the negatives. Here are five things every golfer should know about trees on golf courses:

 

1. Trees Grow

Decision-makers at golf courses often underestimate the extent and speed of tree growth. A tree that seemed harmlessly out in the rough can crowd the line of play sooner than people think. Poorly placed trees cause difficulties for golfers and superintendents that will only worsen over time. The best way to avoid these problems is to account for the full size of a tree prior to planting. If a tree is already too close to the line of play, the options are limited and removing the tree is probably the best solution.
Failing to account for the full size of trees when they are planted leads to long-term issues.

2. Grass Needs Sun

When trees and turf compete for sunlight, trees win. Shade limits turf growth and prevents areas from drying, causing poor playing conditions. Shade also extends frost delays and leaves turf more vulnerable to winter injury. Pruning trees to allow light and air to pass through, and removing trees that block sunlight from key playing surfaces will improve playing conditions and reduce maintenance costs.
Pruning or removing trees that shade playing surfaces can improve course conditions and reduce maintenance costs.

3. Cleanup Costs Money

Certain trees drop significant amounts of leaves, sticks, fruit, bark and other debris. When these trees are located close to greens, daily cleanup could be required before the greens can be mowed and made ready for play. In addition, some courses spend tens of thousands of dollars each year on autumn leaf and debris cleanup. 
Greenside trees that drop leaves, sticks, fruit and bark lead to costly and time-consuming cleanup efforts. (USGA/Steven Gibbons)

4. The 'Root' Of The Problem

Trees’ extensive root systems often spread well beyond their canopy. Tree roots compete with turf for water and nutrients, which is why you often see dry, thin turf in areas surrounding tree trunks. In addition, trees with aggressive surface roots can damage mowing equipment and cartpaths, and create poor playing conditions. Pruning tree roots with specialized equipment helps superintendents manage these issues without injuring the tree. 
Trees with aggressive surface roots can create issues for golfers, superintendents and cartpaths.

5. We Need Room To Play

As trees squeeze the lines of play, golf courses can become too challenging for the average golfer. This slows pace of play and makes golf less enjoyable. Courses that provide adequate space between trees and playing corridors, and between the trees themselves, improve playability and enhance the quality of trees on the course.

5. We Need Room To Play

As trees squeeze the lines of play, golf courses can become too challenging for the average golfer. This slows pace of play and makes golf less enjoyable. Courses that provide adequate space between trees and playing corridors, and between the trees themselves, improve playability and enhance the quality of trees on the course.
To learn more about trees and other important Course Care topics, visit the Course Care section of USGA.org. 

5. We Need Room To Play

As trees squeeze the lines of play, golf courses can become too challenging for the average golfer. This slows pace of play and makes golf less enjoyable. Courses that provide adequate space between trees and playing corridors, and between the trees themselves, improve playability and enhance the quality of trees on the course.
To learn more about trees and other important Course Care topics, visit the Course Care section of USGA.org. 
When there is adequate space between trees they are healthier, turf conditions are better and golfers have plenty of room to play.

To learn more about trees and other important Course Care topics, visit the Course Care section of USGA.org. 

5. We Need Room To Play

As trees squeeze the lines of play, golf courses can become too challenging for the average golfer. This slows pace of play and makes golf less enjoyable. Courses that provide adequate space between trees and playing corridors, and between the trees themselves, improve playability and enhance the quality of trees on the course.
To learn more about trees and other important Course Care topics, visit the Course Care section of USGA.org. 

Tuesday, October 01, 2019

Greenkeeper of the Month


Congratulations to our team player of the month of September, Dylan Vinson.  Dylan is a hard worker and very flexible, always will to do what is necessary of the golf course.  This is a time of year where the staff is ready to change gears, as they grow slightly tired of the same tasks day in and day out.  It's players like Dylan who understand that we need to continue to focus on details as the season winds down.  Congratulations, Dylan!

Sunday, September 29, 2019

Boxwood Blight Fungicides




I posted yesterday about boxwood treatments.  The two fungicides needed are Daconil and Tebuconazole.  Daconil is easy to find because it is the most common fungicide carried by lawn and garden centers.  Daconil is clearly written across the bottle.  On the other hand, Tebuconazole isn't marked so clearly.  Above is the brand of tebuconazole that is sold at Lowe's.  You will have to look in the lower left hand corner (see bottom photo) where the active ingredients are listed to know what particular fungicide it is. 


If you go to gets these products and they don't have Tebuconazole, you can substitute it for one of these two fungicides that are also commonly found at home centers:

Propaconazole
or
Thiophanate Methyl

Again, you'll have to look in the lower left hang corner to see if one of the above active ingredients is present.

Bittersweet


Its that time of year when nurseries and grocery stores sell Bittersweet, a popular fall decoration Bittersweet is the plant hanging from the roof (this is Bryson's Food Store), on both sides of the breezeway.  Bittersweet is incredibly aggressive and will take over once the seeds are spread by birds and humans.  If you want to do the Highlands environment a favor, consider NOT purchasing these plant cuttings or wreaths.  Once this stuff gets established on your property, you will regret ever buying it in the first place.  

Saturday, September 28, 2019

Boxwood Blight

This fall, I've received numerous calls about boxwood blight.  Here is a guide I wrote last year to email members when they wanted more information.  This blight will continue to be an issue well into the future.